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Favorite place to visit in Germany

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  • Favorite place to visit in Germany

    What is your favorite place to visit in Germany? If you've not yet been to Germany, where in Germany would you most like to visit?

    Don't see your fave on the list? [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif[/img]
    Click on "new topic" and tell us what part of Germany you love the most! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]

    Colleen Costello, HOST Bonjour
    Community Host & Team Leader: England,France & Europe
    www.IndependentTraveler.com
    Colleen Costello
    Message Board Moderator

    Host Bonjour
    www.IndependentTraveler.com
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  • #2
    just back from 3 weeks again in germany. liked the middle rhine the most. others with us liked mosel more. trier intersting with roman ruins.
    also enjoyed wurzburg and dinkelsbuhl.

    Comment


    • #3
      My brother's experience

      My brother recently returned from a brief military duty in Germany. He was stationed at Rheinstein Air Force Base. He absolutely loved the Munich area. My brother talked for weeks about the amazing views of the Alps. He also really enjoyed the lively pub atmosphere. He liked it so much he didn't want to return! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img] What a shame, I could have had his car! [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img]

      Visit Germany, you'll love it!
      Jennifer

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      • #4
        Favorite place in Germany

        After reading the poll, it looks like a lot of people agree with me about Munich and Bavaria. I would head back in a minute. A year ago summer, I spent a month in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. I traveled alone and by train and thoroughly enjoyed it. In fact I liked all the places on the poll except the one I can't comment on because I didn't go there: the Black Forest. I even like Berlin and I was there during that wild weekend of the Love Parade! Another highlight, which I hope to repeat in 9 years was the Passion Play at Oberammergau. I ordered my ticket on the Internet and planned my trip around the date I chose. Fantastic! But I do love Munich. My one problem was that I took too many tours around the town and didn't leave myself enough time to see Munich itself, a folly I commited in Vienna too. Suffice to say I would head back to all the places on the poll given the opportunity. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]

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        • #5
          Favorite place in Germany

          What do you mean that you "even" liked Berlin? Berlin is fabulous! Tons of museums, good restaurants, great theater/music/opera scene and canals and rivers for wonderful day or half day boat cruises all over. In fact, the waterways of Berlin are much more beautiful than the Thames or Seine. There were people sailing all over.

          While much of Berlin was destroyed during World War II, much has been rebuilt. It is an alive, exciting city and I cannot wait to visit again.

          I found Berlin much more exciting than The Black Forest, by the way.

          What about Hamburg? That city is almost totally unappreciated by North Americans. I did a home exchange there a couple of years ago and had a wonderful time. I did Lubeck, one of the old "Hansa" ports on a side trip. The historic center of Lubeck is nicely preserved and there is a wonderful puppetry museum and theater.

          Never miss a chance to sit down or go to the toilet and you'll have a great trip!

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          • #6
            Berlin

            This is where it is all happening. The new architecture, the cafes (full at 1 am on weeknights), museums. A big city without parking problems! Pottsdam not far. And the Sprey wandering through the city. Don't miss the food floor in Kaufhof des Westens. You can spend a day there. Also the china floor. You will never think of Harrods again.

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            • #7
              Berlin

              I believe that what JMS Coach meant by saying "even Berlin" (this seemed to shock some [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_confused.gif[/img] ) was in part due to the fact that Berlin is very much a "work in progress" and that most people (ie westerners) have not yet visited this city which had been closed off to visitors for such a long time. Berlin is still a mystery to some and so perhaps some people are simply "surprised" at how they feel once they arrive in comparison to any preconceived notions.

              I visited Berlin, Rostock and Güstrow last summer; not my first trip to Germany but my first foray into the former 'east'. Although I've traveled to many places around the world, perhaps I was a bit naïve insofar as my expectations were about this trip to the 'east'. It was *very* different from the former 'west' Germany, but in retrospect, and after speaking with many former 'east' Germans, why wouldn't it be? Although over a decade has gone by since the Wall came down and progress has been made in rebuilding and restoring Berlin, by the admission of native Berliners I spoke with last summer, there's yet a long way to go. By the end of the war, Berlin was all but destroyed. The city will never be what it was, no one really knows what it was like during the cold war and it's not yet matured into its next incarnation. I was traveling in Germany with French friends, but I found that a majority of Berlin's visitors were German; mostly former 'westerners', after that I'd say the next largest group were Scandinavians (it's close by!) curious as the the rest of the world to see what's happening now in Berlin.

              I travel alone most of the time and like to chat up as many people as I can, it usually just happens - I don't go stalking down folks to chat with. This will be easier to do as more of the populus (locals and visitors) speak English; don't get me wrong, there are English speakers in Berlin, but I wouldn't say they're in abundance. Why would they be? English was not taught to east Berliners in schools until recent years; business people of course are usually conversant. And although there is a veritable building boom taking place in the former 'east,' there is a palatable difference that lingers between the 'east' and 'west' Berlin.

              Does any of this make Berlin bad? Of course not. Should visitors be aware of what Berlin is like right now, of course! Travelers should always try and research their destinations, especially those in transition. I failed to do this because one of the people I was traveling with had been to the 'east' previously (even when it was still the 'east') and she also spoke fluent German. So as a result, I was lax and hadn't fully prepared myself for the trip.

              Yes, the Spree river is pretty; the Ku'damm is a nice boulevard to stroll along & of course there is a vibrant nightlife, lots of museums etc. But Berlin is interesting and it is different, as I suppose it should be. I think Berlin will continue to differ itself from every other major European city; I see it becoming the Hong Kong or New York City of Europe. A bustling, thriving metropolis it will surely be. Right now, it is still in transition. No one is saying not to visit or that it's not worth a trip. It's in a state of flux/change/development and some folks will feel different about the city. People have different reactions to many other cities around the world all the time. "Surprise" reactions to Berlin ought not to be construed as a "diss" of the city. True travelers simply consider their impression a legitamite observation indicating neither a definitive positive or negative evaluation as to the worthiness of visiting the city.

              Relax, folks. Breathe. Berlin is a city unlike many other in the world and folks are bound to have varied reactions. If you loved it, great [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif[/img]! If it surprised you, fine. If it wasn't 'all that and a bag of chips' well, that's fine too. Berlin is not "done" yet, and everyone is entitled to an honest impression without reproach. All of the collective impressions of travelers are meaningful, whether they are glowing, gray or anything in between.

              Happy Travels [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

              Colleen Costello, HOST Bonjour
              Community Host & Team Leader: England, France & Europe
              www.independenttraveler.com
              AOL Keyword: Traveler
              Colleen Costello
              Message Board Moderator

              Host Bonjour
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              Comment


              • #8
                Berlin

                Sorry, Colleen, I have to disagree with you. There is no reason to wait to see Berlin because it is a work in progress. As you can see from my trip reports, I had a fabulous time there.

                Of course, things are changing there. Things are changing everywhere. No big city is ever "done". Of course Berlin is evolving from its days of a split personality. It is a city, however, that you can visit again and again--like Paris.

                Never miss a chance to sit down or go to the toilet and you'll have a great trip!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Berlin

                  It seems I need to explain "I even liked Berlin."
                  The reason I used that wording was that at the time I checked the poll results, Berlin had not been chosen by anyone. I did not mean it as a dig at Berlin. I thoroughly enjoyed my time in the city. (Although the whistle blowing of the Love Paraders got to be a bit much!) I would certainly say Berlin is a great place to visit.
                  [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Berlin

                    Just read some of the other posts about Berlin and have to add the following. I am a foodie from way back and love visiting markets and food shops. The food floor of Ka Da We is by the far the most interesting and sumptuous I have seen. I think it tops Dallmayr in Munich, which I have read about for years. I also would place it above Fauchon in Paris, which I visited this past summer. [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif[/img]

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                    • #11
                      Please re-read my recent post

                      "Sorry, Colleen, I have to disagree with you. There is no reason to wait to see Berlin because it is a work in progress. As you can see from my trip reports, I had a fabulous time there."

                      Lauren,

                      Please re-read my recent post on Berlin; I did not tell folks to not go and see Berlin. I simply described what *my* observations and impressions were. You had a "fabulous time" and that's great! Back before you went on your trip and mentioned your Berlin home exchange, I'd asked if you could post-pone your trip......this was *not* meant to imply that Berlin was not worth visiting. It was only about the idea that Berlin might be a heck of a trip a few years from now. New York City just recently made the top of some major travel destinations list. If someone would have predicted this five or ten years ago, I'd have told them to take off their rose-colored glasses, pick another city and take a rain check on NYC. I know that living in a city is not like visiting a city, but I have visited London, Hong Kong, Paris (which I consider "home" too!), Sydney and lots of other big cities. No place in the world is like NYC.

                      Before I'd taken my first trip abroad, my Mom thought I was nuts going off traveling overseas alone. I told her that I've been going to Manhattan almost every day since the mid 80's (not exactly Shanri-la back then!) and if I can manage in Manhattan, I can handle myself overseas. She went and told this to her worldy, well traveled, millionaire boss and he told her "she's right!" And I think NYC is someplace everyone ought to visit, **but I don't think everyone will feel the same way about it**!! Why should they? I adore Paris, but I don't think everyone does, though they may still appreciate it. Hong Kong was fascinating & frantic; I don't pretend to think everyone would agree with me. I think I'd stick my neck out only for Sydney, Australia to be probably the only *major* world city that everyone could love! But not everyone would love the flying time it takes to get there (though they'd surely feel it was worth it if they did).

                      It simply seems worth informing travelers about what it's like today in Berlin. I never said "don't go" or that I didn't like it or that it was an awful city to visit. I thought travelers had a right to know what to expect; I'd no intention of trying to influence anyone's choice of visiting Berlin. I went to Berlin willingly - no one dragged me there and I was glad I saw it. I look forward to seeing it again someday.

                      I just recently finished writing up the "Don't Miss" article of IndependentTraveler.com's new Germany Community:
                      http://www.independenttraveler.com/c...nity.cfm?ID=12
                      Guess where I started? Berlin. And while I could have easily devoted an entire article to Berlin, I did my best to mention just a sampling of a bazillion interesting things to see & do in Berlin. It was *not* a difficult article to write. But Berlin was, is and will always be more than just a place to see things. It has a place in history unlike any other city and no doubt will earn a new place in history unlike many other cities. It's already happening. And while some may not want to wait a minute longer before going (party on!) to others I might say what I'd have said about NYC, "wait, the best is yet to come!" It's up to travelers to decide for themselves. Some may be curious to see the "process" of Berlin's rebirth...shouldn't people be informed and thus able to decide for themselves? They deserve that and not someone reporting "go, I loved it" or "skip it, it bites!" One traveler's testimonial
                      can not be construed to be an unequivocal guarantee of contentment anywhere, anytime.

                      I felt I gave a fair, honest account of "today's" Berlin, which I stand by now. I am not here to tell people where they should or should not go, nor am I at all interested in engaging in any pro/con Berlin debate. As I mentioned previously, I made a point of speaking with Berliners, transplanted Americans (former military that stayed on after discharge) and anyone else I could talk to. When I travel, I do all that I can to ensure I'm not someone merely looking into a fishbowl; I prefer to dive right in and get with the other fishes! It was *their* comments that I took note of, as I contemplated my own feelings about Berlin. I've tried to report my impressions, as well as the impressions of others I've met in an unbiased, journalistic style. I do not write to decide for people; I write for people to help them decide for themselves. It's just information; folks can do what they like with it, just like a newspaper - clip out an article to save as reference or go ahead and line the birdcage with it.

                      Berliners seemed happy to be Berliners and even more excited about what their city would be like in 5-10 years. The former military man married a German woman he met while stationed there and stayed. He worked at the Berlin Hard Rock and was happy because the city was evolving; he was excited about his 2 kids growing up in Berlin.

                      I went into post offices with super nice, helpful clerks and supermarkets where no one spoke English. Hung out at a webcafe with great music, cool computers and folks from all over the world. I was at both an austere 'east Berlin' pension and a stylish, 'west Berlin' 3*** Savoy hotel, had the best taxi ride of my life in a brand new Audi A8 (what a car!! Made the Benz taxi seem pedestrian [img]/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif[/img]) I saw the TV Tower & beneath it, a plethora of cranes, graffiti and boarded up construction sites. I saw the remaining bit of Wall still standing and thought the Checkpoint Charlie museum spoke volumes about the plight of a divided Berlin. I didn't do much nightlife aside from the webcafe or staying late out at dinner; I'm a young woman alone in a city where I have no better than a pre-schooler's knowledge of German. Common sense told me to skip the clubbing; besides, Í've kind of done the whole clubbing thing years ago & had a lot fun. My interests are different now.

                      Does every city change - of course. Who doesn't know that; please don't presume me to be so naïve after having been around the world and growing up in one of the biggest, most diverse & at times, dangerous cities in the world. I would not presume that of any other traveler. Ten years ago, I'd have had a lot more admonintions to folks visiting my home city but now, so long as one has some common sense, there's little I'd have to worry about sending my guests (or me!) out into the big city. There'd still be things I need to point out, however. There always are! And I wouldn't worry too much about folks going to Berlin either; but just as I'd tell folks what's changing in my own city, I'd feel irresponsible not to report about the same things I encounter (and upon which locals concur) while traveling.

                      The things that have changed in my city, or in other foreign cities cannot really be compared to what is changing in Berlin. There are few cities on this planet that has seen what Berlin has seen, and survived - barely. My city didn't used to have a wall in it that I'd risk getting shot & killed if I'd try to cross. Does yours? My city wasn't blown to bits 56 years ago (half of it rebuilt, half of it left in shambles) was yours? In my city, folks living on the East side were not told to hate folks on the West side & vice versa. Are there parts of my city I avoided at certain points in the past and still would now? Yes. Are there parts of the city that I used to avoid but don't any longer? Yes. But that all took time. I never mis-represented the state of my city then and I won't do it now. I have folks come to visit me from all over the world; folks who've been kind enough to host me in their homes. I owe it to my visitors and to my fellow travelers to be honest.

                      I do not have the right to pre-determine anyone's impressions of my city, of Berlin or any other place on this earth based on my feelings, be they positive, negative or indifferent. No one else should presume that their experience is what every other traveler will or should experience. We can all only testify, but we cannot be each other's judge and jury. Our verdicts are our own.

                      I think John Steinbeck said it best:
                      "A journey is a person in itself; no two are alike."

                      'Nuff said.

                      Colleen Costello, HOST Bonjour
                      Community Host & Team Leader: England, France & Europe
                      www.independenttraveler.com
                      AOL Keyword: Traveler

                      [This message was edited by Host Bonjour on Monday, 10 September 2001 at 03:36 AM.]
                      Colleen Costello
                      Message Board Moderator

                      Host Bonjour
                      www.IndependentTraveler.com
                      Follow on Twiiter @TravelEditor & Facebook
                      HostColleen
                      www.FamilyVacationCritic.com
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                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Berlin

                        Colleen, you advised me to wait to see Berlin until the construction was over. The construction is going to go on for years and it is something people will have to accept as part of the city for a long time to come.

                        If I had taken your advice, I would have canceled my home exchange and gone elsewhere. I had a fabulous time in Berlin and am glad I did not wait to see the work in progress. It will certainly bear revisiting as the work proceeds.

                        Never miss a chance to sit down or go to the toilet and you'll have a great trip!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          ::::sigh:::::

                          Here is what I said: I only *suggested* waiting as an option to someone asking about visiting Berlin, and explained why. I went on to say what was interesting about the city, mentioned side trips outside Berlin, and all of the promise for the future. Finally, all in all, my trip went OK and I was glad to have had the experience of being in Berlin. I refuse to be misquoted. Here's that old post of mine:

                          http://messages.independenttraveler....94&m=273095166

                          Now, my own city has been blown to bits, so has the Pentagon, near Arlington, VA. My former workplace, a place I spent thousands and thousands of hours working as a CPA on the 101st floor of WTC tower #1 (with the antenna on it) is now GONE. A part of me is gone with it, but this is only a smattering of what Germans must have felt after Berlin was obliterated and left in shambles for decades. I was to have visitors from England in October and November. I'd recommend to them and anyone else to *wait* for now. We are, in the space of one day, no longer the same city. This is not what people want to see on holiday; that is the *only* reason I suggested waiting, if one was "impressionable" and likely to be exceedingly moved by undeniable realities in Berlin, and now, here in my home. So, I''ll say what I said about my home city what I said about Berlin; consider waiting.

                          I'm NOT SAYING DON'T GO.........

                          I'm just proffering a suggestion, one I feel that is justified if one is expecting 'giddiness' and 'bliss', or is likely to be saddened by real tragedies, be they past or present. Berlin is alive, so is NYC (sort of) but I plan on advising my English friends to wait. They may still come and truly enjoy NYC just as others enjoy Berlin and other cities around the world, but they may want to avoid seeing and hearing about a NYC landmark known the world over, that is now a heaping pile of rubble with thousands of loved ones hopelessly lost within. Lower Manhattan will be a cordoned off combat zone; a giant construction site in months and years to come. Not a place to be for ther faint of heart; same goes for Berlin. It's alive there, no doubt; but sensitive folks might find themselves overcome by what used to be there that isn't there anymore and not yet rebuilt. Unfortunately now, our city is in the same category. Still alive, but badly wounded with physical & emotional scars that will not heal for a long, long time. Go to Disneyworld; when it re-opens, that is.

                          I live but a few miles from the southern tip of Manhattan, a skyline that is gone now, as are thousands of innocent souls, as I went by on Monday, 10th September, crossing the Manhattan bridge on the métro. The smell in the air now is indescribable; smoke and fire - it's all still burning - buildings and bodies. A holiday town? No, I don't think so. Berlin is now probably ahead of us, but still recovering too, after all these years. Great for some visitors, not great for sensitive, impressionable types. I read a souvenir, travel picture guide to Sicily this past weekend; regarding the catacombs, there is a specificly worded suggestion that (paraphrased) "impressionable people likely to be emotionally affected by this site ought to consider skipping it." I call that considerate, responsible travel advice, not unlike that proffered to visitors in Germany considering a visit to a concentration camp. There are many other ways to pay respects and "never forget" by visiting Holocaust memorials, doing good works for Survivors and their families and so on. What some people need to do, others simply cannot do; not because of disrespect or cowardice. Emotional frailty can be prohibitive for some, myself included.

                          Tragedies of hatred linger on and on around the world; wars leave permanent scars. Berlin, the Balkans, the Middle East, China, Tibet, India, Japan, former USSR & more. Some may want to go, need to go; for others, it pays to wait. What makes for a fabulous trip is by no means the same for some as it is for others. Wait or don't wait; everyone needs to decide for themselves. That is the simple point. There are never any guarantees, but folks have the right to get informed and make their own choices. It's up to each individual traveler to red or green light their own travels.

                          I was to go on a short holiday within the USA in a few days; I may theoretically be able to still go, ie. airports opened. But it's not likely that I will go, despite my destination being as it was and no where near here. I don't fancy being strip-searched, having my bags unpacked or whatever they must (and *should*) do now. That's *my* choice; if other have travel plans this weekend, I'm not telling folks to stay or go. This is just my choice; and that's all I was saying about Berlin, based on *my* own impressions on what was essentially an OK trip.

                          No matter what anyone decides now, allow extra time, think first, be safe & Godspeed.

                          Colleen Costello, HOST Bonjour
                          Community Host & Team Leader: England, France & Europe
                          www.independenttraveler.com
                          AOL Keyword: Traveler
                          Colleen Costello
                          Message Board Moderator

                          Host Bonjour
                          www.IndependentTraveler.com
                          Follow on Twiiter @TravelEditor & Facebook
                          HostColleen
                          www.FamilyVacationCritic.com
                          Follow on Twitter @FamilyVacation & Facebook

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                          • #14
                            Berlin/Bamberg

                            Berlin is fantastic, I usually don't do the large cities but I would go back in a minute. What a wonderful place. Full of history, excitement and I think the spot that I will always remember is the square where the first book burning was carried out ... it still sends shivers down my spine. Don't pass this city up. I also love Bamberg the "little Venice" in Germany. Lovely town, small and inviting, with great smoked beer.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Favorite place to visit in Germany

                              I've had great visits to Idar-Oberstein for business. Having time to walk the streets of Idar, visiting the cave and hiking the hills around the city. Visiting the castle and the church built into the rocks. A beautiful train ride from the Frankfurt airport, about an hour. A great family owned hotel called Zum Schwan, excellent restaurant where they cook their Spiesbraten right on the fireplace. Very friendly people and just a nice, relaxing place to visit.

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